tonglen

a blog for the ones who strive to be here now and cultivate lovingkindness. Peace out and love.
design-is-fine:

John De Cesare, Transcription of Ave Maria, a sacred melody adapted to the first prelude of J. S. Bach by Charles Gounod, 1956. Drawing. USA. Cooper Hewitt

design-is-fine:

John De Cesare, Transcription of Ave Maria, a sacred melody adapted to the first prelude of J. S. Bach by Charles Gounod, 1956. Drawing. USA. Cooper Hewitt

20aliens:

Blue (Moby Dick), 1943by Jackson Pollock

20aliens:

Blue (Moby Dick), 1943
by Jackson Pollock

Nothing is real when you are alone in your room with the clock ticking loudly into the false cheerful brilliance of the electric light.

—Sylvia Plath  (via dieworten)

(Source: orgaein, via englishmajorinrepair)

theenergyissue:

Domestic Erosion: Reading the Energy of Everyday Objects

English artist Tim Taylor investigates new ways to understand the banal objects in our daily lives as a way to expose their hidden or overlooked features and meanings. In “Domestic Erosion,” Taylor takes three familiar devices from the domestic sphere—a hair dryer, iron, and tea kettle—and allows them to take on a life of their own as energetic objects. After plugging in the devices, Taylor places them, respectively, in front of, on, and under a massive block of ice and films the interaction. In a sense, the objects “create” the artwork: their generic factory setting dictate the form and outcome of the piece. Taylor’s work not only highlights the hidden energy of our everyday objects, but proposes ways in which we might question our accepted understanding of their function and logic. 

museumuesum:

David Hammons

Untitled, 1989

Glass and silicone glue, 37 1/4 x 37 1/2 x 7 3/4 in. (94.6 x 95.1 x 19.5 cm)

Tele-Present Water Simulates a Spot in the Pacific from Halfway Around the World

Artist David Bowen is known for his kinetic sculptures that are driven by real-world data from natural phenomenon. For his work “Tele-Present Water,” first exhibited at the National Museum in Wroclaw, Poland, Bowen pulled real-time wave intensity and frequency data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) buoy station 46246 (49°59’7″ N 145°5’20″ W) located in the remote Shumagin Islands of Alaska. This information was scaled and transferred to a mechanical grid structure, resulting in an uncanny live simulation of the movement of water from halfway around the world. The piece, along with Bowen’s other works, speaks to the way technology and telecommunications can both alienate us from and unite us with the natural world. While technology has enabled us to control and model phenomena with unprecedented precision, it may also provide a means to understand the world in a more intimate, visceral way. 

(Source: designboom.com, via euphues)